observando

quote blog

my name is axel marazzi and i eat words for breakfast.

these are my texts . about me . ask . submit

“Books are both our luxuries and our daily bread.”

– Henry Stevens

“What are a friend’s books for if not to be borrowed?”

– Tom Stoppard, Arcadia

“In my view, nineteen pounds of old books are at least nineteen times as delicious as one pound of fresh caviar.”

– Anne Fadiman

“A home without books is like a body without a soul.”

– Cicero

“Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.”

– Richard Steele

“If the self-help books worked, it would be a shrinking industry not a growing one.”

– Steve Maraboli, Life, the Truth, and Being Free

“The man who is contented to be only himself, and therefore less a self, is in prison. My own eyes are not enough for me, I will see through those of others. Reality, even seen through the eyes of many, is not enough. I will see what others have invented. Even the eyes of all humanity are not enough. I regret that the brutes connot write books. Very gladly would I learn what face things present to a mouse or a bee; more gladly still would I perceive the olfactory world charged with all the information and emotion it carries for a dog. Literary experience heals the wound, without undermining the privilege, of individuality… in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myself. Like the night sky in the Greek poem, I see with a myriad of eyes, but it is still I who see. Here, as in worship, in love, in moral action, and in knowing, I transcend myself; and am never more myself than when I do.”

– C.S. Lewis

Anonymous asked: Do you think The Bibble is a good book?

Didn’t read it.

“The other night we talked about literature’s elimination of the unessential, so that we are given a concentrated “dose” of life. I said, almost indignantly, “That’s the danger of it, it prepares you to live, but at the same time, it exposes you to disappointments because it gives a heightened concept of living, it leaves out the dull or stagnant moments. You, in your books, also have a heightened rhythm, and a sequence of events so packed with excitement that I expected all your life to be delirious, intoxicated.”
Literature is an exaggeration, a dramatization, and those who are nourished on it (as I was) are in great danger of trying to approximate an impossible rhythm. Trying to live up to Dostoevskian scenes every day. And between writers there is a straining after extravagance. We incite each other to jazz-up our rhythm.”

– Ana├»s Nin

“Like flies in amber, like corpses frozen in ice, that which according to the laws of nature should pass away is, by the miracle of ink on paper, preserved. It is a kind of magic. As one tends the graves of the dead, so I tend the books. And every day I open a volume or two, read a few lines or pages, allow the voices of the forgotten dead to resonate inside my head.”

– Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale